Rad Racer Nintendo NES Complete in Box Variants

NES Rad Racer CIB Variants Front

Pictures of my two complete in box (CIB) variants of Rad Racer for the Nintendo NES from my personal video game collection. You can see that the Nintendo seal’s are different on the game paks as well as on the game boxes. One is known as the “circle seal” and the other is known as the “round seal”. I only have the instruction manual and the 3-D glasses for one of them unfortunately.

NES Rad Racer CIB Variants Front
NES Rad Racer CIB Variants Front
NES Rad Racer CIB Variants Back
NES Rad Racer CIB Variants Back

Nintendo NES Opening Title Screen Intro Videos

A compilation of Nintendo NES Opening Title Screen Intro Videos. Some games have the title theme and demo gameplay footage while others just are the static title screen.

Adventure Island

8 Eyes

A Nightmare on Elm Street

Contra

GI Joe

Life Force

Power Blade

Balloon Fight

The Goonies 2

Bonk’s Adventure

Nightshade

DuckTales

Contra Force

Journey To Silius

Zombie Nation

Castlevania

Kid Icarus

Final Fantasy

Pinbot

Blades of Steel

Faxanadu

Double Dragon

Clash at Demon Head

Felix the Cat

Mega Man 2

Mario is Missing

Ultima Exodus

Nintendo NES Blue LED Console Mod

View of Blue LED modded Nintendo NES

Nintendo NES Blue LED Console Mod

One way to make your Nintendo NES stand out is to remove that boring old red power LED and replace it with a different color LED of your choice.

I recently installed a blue LED in my NES so I took pics and figured I’d do a write up for someone if they wanted to do this mod. It doesn’t take a lot of skill and it’s very inexpensive to do. I hope you enjoy my DIY how to.

Requirements:


A Nintendo NES (duh)
Soldering Iron
Solder
De-soldering braid
LED (duh again)
Phillips screwdriver
About 20 minutes total time (or more depending on your skill level) to take apart the NES and solder in the new LED

Tools required to install the new led on the Nintendo NES
Tools required: Soldering Iron, Solder, and De-Soldering Braid

Lets begin!

Start taking apart the Nintendo NES:
1. Remove the 6 Phillips screws from the bottom of the Nintendo’s case.

View of the bottom of the Nintendo NES showing the 6 screws that need to be removed.
View of the bottom of the Nintendo NES showing the 6 screws that need to be removed.

2. Remove the top case and unscrew the 7 Phillips screws that attach the metal casing. Remove the metal case.

View of the 7 screws that hold on the metal shielding on Nintendo NES
View of the 7 screws that hold on the metal shielding on the Nintendo NES

3. Remove the 4 Phillips screws that attach the game cartridge caddy. Slip out the caddy.

View of the 4 screws that attach on the cartridge caddy on the Nintendo NES
View of the 4 screws that attach on the cartridge caddy on the Nintendo NES

4. Remove the final 2 Phillips screws that hold in the NES motherboard.

View of the 2 screws that hold in the Nintendo NES motherboard
View of the 2 screws that hold in the Nintendo NES motherboard

5. Re position the motherboard out of the way and remove the 2 Phillips screws that secure the Power/Reset board.

View of the 2 screws that secure the power-reset board in the Nintendo NES
View of the 2 screws that secure the power-reset board in the Nintendo NES

Now plug in your soldering iron and get your de-soldering braid ready. Desolder the old LED and remove the plastic light spreader with it.

Make a note of the polarity of your new LED because it WON’T work if you install it the wrong way. The way you can tell the polarity of the LED is by looking at the legs. One leg will be longer than the other. The longer leg should be on the right side if your looking at the NES from the front. If you install it with the wrong polarity it won’t damage it or the NES it just won’t light up.

View of the Nintendo NES LED polarity
View of the Nintendo NES LED polarity
View of the Nintendo NES light spreader and stock Red LED
View of the Nintendo NES light spreader and stock Red LED

Insert your new LED into the light spreader and solder the new LED into the power/reset board.

Put the NES back together and enjoy your new colorful NES power LED.

View of Blue LED modded Nintendo NES
View of Blue LED modded Nintendo NES

I hope you found this DIY how to helpful. Please leave me a comment if you feel so inclined.

Happy gaming!

Nintendo NES MAX

Nintendo NES MAX
Nintendo NES MAX
Nintendo NES MAX

The NES MAX Controller was released in 1988 by Nintendo. Comparing it to the standard Nintendo NES controller it only has one thing better which are turbo A and B buttons. Everything else about the NES MAX sucks.

It seems the NES MAX was designed to be primarily used by young kids because the size of the controller is small. Width wise it’s shorter than the standard NES controller.

The NES MAX Cycloid SUCKS
The NES MAX Cycloid SUCKS

The worst part about the NES MAX is the “cycloid”. Instead of using the standard NES controller’s cross shaped four directional joypad Nintendo used a round disc called the cycloid. It wasn’t very responsive at all and it was uncomfortable to use for long gaming periods. Most gamers ended up using NES MAX’s 8 way controller ring that surrounded the cycloid.

A Nightmare on Elm Street

Nightmare on Elm Street Title Freddy

A Nightmare on Elm Street was released in 1989 by LJN for the NES. It’s a side scrolling platformer game. The gameplay is based on two different Freddy Krueger movies, A Nightmare on Elm Street part 3: Dream Warriors and part 4: The Dream master.

The goal of the game is to collect Freddy’s bones and burn them in the boiler at Elm Street High School. Freddy’s bones are scattered all over the place in each level.

You start out on Elm street and your first goal is to go into a house (NOTE: not all houses are open even if the door looks open) . You need to collect all the bones in order to unlock a boss fight at the end of the level. If you have missed a bone or two and get to the end of the level you will have no choice but to go back through the level to find the missing bones. Once you fight the boss you will get a key that lets you in another house.

The gameplay also has a twist in that your character can fall asleep. In order to stay awake you need to find coffee. There’s a meter in game that shows how close you are to falling asleep. If you do fall asleep the gameplay shifts to the “Dream World”. In the dream world the monsters are more powerful but you also get to use your special Dream Warrior abilities. There are three different Dream Warrior abilities based on which one you have collected: A ninja who can throw ninja stars and jump kick, an Acrobat who throws javelins and does a jumping somersault and a magician who shoots fireballs and can hover.

The controls can be touchy but they’re pretty easy to master after some practice. Some of the levels have spots where enemies will spawn out of nowhere (bats mostly) and you can get some cheap deaths. It’s not a huge problem but when the screen gets crowded it can be frustrating.

The graphics are good for a 1989 NES game. The graphics for the Freddy boss fights are good for its time.

The music is well done. It’s catchy and it fits the mood of the game. Some have complained because LJN has used some of the music before in different games. I don’t see what the big deal is because it’s not bad music. I could see criticizing LJN if they reused bad music. That’s not the case here.

Another unique thing about A Nightmare on Elm Street is you can play up to four players simulataneously if you have a NES Satellite or NES Four Score.